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Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of dollar and the trade deficit in the 1980s found in the catalog.

dollar and the trade deficit in the 1980s

Martin S. Feldstein

dollar and the trade deficit in the 1980s

a personal view

by Martin S. Feldstein

  • 213 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Balance of trade -- United States.,
  • Money market -- United States.,
  • United States -- Economic conditions -- 1980-1989.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementMartin Feldstein.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- no 4325
    ContributionsNational Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination27p. ;
    Number of Pages27
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17301062M

    The Budget and Trade Deficits Aren't Really Twins Martin Feldstein. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in January NBER Program(s):International Trade and Investment, Public Economics, Economic Fluctuations and Growth, International Finance and Macroeconomics Although the link between the U.S. budget deficit and trade deficit in the s was so clear that the two were popularly .   Think of it this way: Since , the annual trade deficit with Mexico has grown from essentially zero dollars to $60 billion. But over the same period, we added about $ billion in annual.

      Trade Deficit Grows as Strong Dollar Hurts Exports The New York Stock Exchange on Monday. A strong dollar is weighing on American exports, . According to conventional wisdom, trade balances reflect a country's competitive strength-the lower the trade deficit, the stronger the country's industries and the higher its rate of economic growth.

    Last winter, the OMB said the fiscal deficit would be $ billion. Hokenson and a colleague, Gert von der Linde, projected a deficit of between $ billion and $ billion. Following the dollar depreciation, U.S. ex- ports accelerated sharply and the merchandise trade deficit narrowed considerably (see the Winter issue of this Review). The merchandise trade deficit of $34 billion contracted to $25 billion in A useful method of analysis is to exclude agriculturalFile Size: KB.


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Dollar and the trade deficit in the 1980s by Martin S. Feldstein Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Dollar and the Trade Deficit in the s: A Personal View Martin Feldstein. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in April NBER Program(s):Monetary Economics, International Trade and Investment, International Finance and Macroeconomics, Economic Fluctuations and Growth The sharp gyrations of the dollar and of the trade deficit in the s were among the most novel and least.

Get this from a library. The dollar and the trade deficit in the s: a personal view. [Martin S Feldstein; National Bureau of Economic Research.]. During a trade deficit, the U.S.

dollar generally course, there are numerous inputs that determine currency movements in addition to. The strength of the dollar influences the trade balance. A strong dollar increases the deficit by raising export prices.

A weak dollar does the opposite. Consumer products imports are the primary driver of the United States' trade deficit. The United States exports more services than it imports.

The balance of trade, commercial balance, or net exports (sometimes symbolized as NX), is the difference between the monetary value of a nation's exports and imports over a certain time period. Sometimes a distinction is made between a balance of trade for goods versus one for services.

The balance of trade measures a flow of exports and imports over a given period of time. Get this from a library.

The dollar and the trade deficit in the s: dollar and the trade deficit in the 1980s book personal view. [Martin S Feldstein; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Abstract: The sharp gyrations of the dollar and of the trade deficit in the s were among the most novel and least understood economic developments of the decade.

This paper, which was written as. Trade deficit is an economic measure of international trade in which a country's imports exceeds its exports.

A trade deficit represents an outflow of domestic currency to foreign : Andrew Bloomenthal. The United States foreign trade deficit continues to rank near the top of disturbing economic issues. A number of explanations for the trade imbalance have been proffered, including unfair trade practices abroad, the dollar's high international value, financial problems of some large developing countries, and sluggish growth elsewhere in the industrial world.

The United States ran either a surplus or a small deficit through the s and s, after which a large deficit opened in the s and continued to expand through the s and s.

Forecasters project that the US trade deficit in will reach about $ billion, and the current account deficit will be more than $ billion, or about percent of GDP. For at least the next year or two, however, the US current account deficit will continue to grow-changing the direction of US external balance is not a simple process.

The history of the United States from until includes the last year of the Jimmy Carter presidency, eight years of the Ronald Reagan administration, and the first three years of the George H. Bush presidency, up to the collapse of the Soviet d by the Iran hostage crisis, runaway inflation, and mounting domestic opposition, Carter lost the presidential election to.

As the federal budget deficit declined in the late s, so too did America’s trade deficit. Another, less appealing way to reduce the trade deficit is to reduce investment. The U.S. trade deficit really only got big in the s, precisely the time when the dollar stopped getting devalued at the hands of U.S.

policy, as it had been remorselessly through the mega Author: Brian Domitrovic. The United States is enjoying an economic boom that is fueling the growth of its trade deficit.

At current exchange rates, the strength of the U.S. economy, combined with slow growth in demand in many other parts of the world, will lead to further widening of the U.S.

trade deficit. From the s into the s, the U.S. economy had mostly small trade surpluses—that is, the graphs of Figure 1 show positive numbers. However, starting in the s, the trade deficit increased rapidly, and after a tiny surplus inthe current account trade deficit. The main reason that America’s bilateral trade deficit with Japan exploded in the s is that the Japanese government lifted many of its capital controls with the passage of the Foreign.

The Budget Deficit and the Dollar The dramatic surge in the dollar's value relative to major European cur- rencies was probably the most important economic event of the period between and The dollar's value rose from German marks in mid to.

Downloadable. The sharp gyrations of the dollar and of the trade deficit in the s were among the most novel and least understood economic developments of the decade. This paper, which was written as part of the NBER project on American economic policy in the s, examines the reasons for the dollar's swings and the nature of the policy debate about the appropriate government response to.

Bythe American trade deficit had swelled to $, million. The trade gap began sinking in subsequent years as the dollar depreciated and economic growth in other countries led to increased demand for U.S.

exports. But the American trade deficit swelled again in the late : Mike Moffatt. It is the change in the trade deficit that drives GDP growth, not the level. As long as the trade deficit shrinks, it will add to overall growth, even if the level is still awful.

A rising trade deficit shrinks the economy on just about a dollar-for-dollar basis. Getting the trade deficit under control has to be one of the top economic priorities. However, at some future date, the trade deficit must turn into surplus, so that the foreigners get paid back.

For the trade deficit to turn into a surplus, imports must fall and exports must rise. One way this adjustment can take place is if the dollar depreciates, making imports more expensive for Americans and exports cheaper for foreigners.The U.S.

balance of trade has: gone from a surplus in the s to a deficit in the s and back to a surplus since been in deficit since the s. gone from a deficit in the s to a surplus in the s and back to a deficit since shown a surplus since the s.However, between — just before the collapse of fixed exchange rates — and earlythe U.S.

dollar lost more than 70 percent of its value against the yen and 60 percent of its value against the mark,3 yet, inthe United States had a $69 billion merchandise trade deficit with Japan and a $13 billion deficit with Germany.4 In Author: Michael Blaine.