Last edited by Mogor
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Excitatory Amino Acids and Synaptic Transmission found in the catalog.

Excitatory Amino Acids and Synaptic Transmission

  • 12 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Academic Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Neuroscience,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Neurophysiology,
  • Science,
  • Medical,
  • General,
  • Neurology - General,
  • Neurology & clinical neurophysiology,
  • Neurosciences,
  • Proteins

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsH. V. Wheal (Editor), A. M. Thomson (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages388
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9284060M
    ISBN 100127460314
    ISBN 109780127460314

    Get this from a library! Excitatory amino acid transmission in health and disease. [R Balázs; Richard J Bridges; Carl W Cotman] -- "Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS)." "A central theme of the book is the capacity of the excitatory amino acid system to contribute to. Excitatory amino acids (glutamate and aspartate) form the mainstay of synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. By the same token, dysfunctional, excitotoxic activity of excitatory amino acids can lead to and/or become instrumental in the progression of a number of neurological and neurodegenerative conditions.

    Glutamate and Aspartate: Excitatory Amino Acid Transmitters. Excitatory amino acid transmitters account for most of the fast synaptic transmission that occurs in the mammalian brain. Glutamate and aspartate are the major excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, and several related amino acids, such as N-acetylaspartylglutamate, are also thought to have neurotransmitter roles. Glutamate is a prominent neurotransmitter responsible for excitatory synaptic transmission and is taken up by sodium-dependent excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) on astrocytes to maintain.

    Excitatory amino acids in synaptic transmission in the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway of the rat hippocampus. Collingridge GL, Kehl SJ, McLennan H. 1. The effects of excitatory amino acids and some antagonists applied by ionophoresis to stratum radiatum in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices were examined on the locally recorded Cited by: A. The Excitatory Amino Acids. Amino acid neurotransmitters can be subdivided into the excitatory amino acids aspartate and glutamate, and the inhibitory amino acids GABA and glycine. The ionotropic and metabotropic receptors of the amino acids are known under the name of their main specific agonists (Nakanishi, ; Pin and Duvoisin, ).


Share this book
You might also like
theology of faith

theology of faith

Timolol maleate ophthalmic solution

Timolol maleate ophthalmic solution

My name is Leon

My name is Leon

Berenson and the connoisseurship of Italian painting

Berenson and the connoisseurship of Italian painting

Private prison procurement Department of Corrections

Private prison procurement Department of Corrections

THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR COLLECTION, REEL 19

THE SPANISH CIVIL WAR COLLECTION, REEL 19

Luke the labourer; or the lost son

Luke the labourer; or the lost son

Dino live

Dino live

Escape

Escape

Charles Dickens book of memoranda

Charles Dickens book of memoranda

Sri Ramana Gita

Sri Ramana Gita

West Riding of Yorkshire

West Riding of Yorkshire

The next wave

The next wave

Excitatory Amino Acids and Synaptic Transmission Download PDF EPUB FB2

The excitatory amino acids (EAAs) as neurotransmitters are of vast and rapidly expanding interest. This volume relates current knowledge of the EAAs back to the synapse, where many of their physiologically relevant actions must occur.

Excitatory Amino Acids and Synaptic Transmission is the first book to do : Hardcover. The First Edition of Excitatory Amino Acids and Synaptic Transmission was the first text to provide anoverview of the function of EAAs in transmission at the synapses and in the organization of the nervous system.

The First Edition is a well-respected reference text for neuroscience researchers; it provides a comprehensive account of the physiological, pharmacological, chemical, molecular, Format: Hardcover.

Excitatory Amino Acids and Synaptic Transmission [Howard V. Wheal Alex M. Thomson] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Excitatory Amino Acids and Synaptic TransmissionAuthor: Howard V. Wheal Alex M. Thomson. It has recently become clear that the excitatory amino acids and their receptors are critically linked to normal processes of development and synaptic transmission, and to learning and memory, as well as to identifiable disease processes such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and cortical damage due to Format: Paperback.

Excitatory Amino Acids is the first book entirely dedicated to the results of human testing of modulators of excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters. Key Features Coverage of the field of excitatory amino acids from synaptic function to preclinical and clinical pharmacology.

Excitatory amino acid transmitter function in mammalian central pathways --Amino acid-mediated EPSCs --Presynaptic receptors at a central excitatory synapse --Synaptic transmission at unitary CA3-CA1 connections in the hippocampus --Patch-clamp studies of electrogenic glutamate uptake: ionic dependence, modulation and failure in anoxia.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

This book provides a comprehensive, easy-to-read survey of excitatory amino acids and synaptic transmission. It begins with descriptions of the structure, function, and pharmacology of both the. In the dorsal hom in vivo, microelectrophoresis has been used to administer excitatory amino acid antagonists into the region of single cells activated following electrical or 'natural' stimulation of primary affents.

Both NMDA and non-NMDA com- ponents have been identified by Cited by: Different types of excitatory amino acid receptors probably exercise specific functional roles within the mammalian CNS.

l-Glutamate may be the transmitter at all of these receptors, with extracellular Mg 2+ regulating the sensitivity of one particular receptor-ionophore system. As Jeff Watkins explains, this probable role of l-glutamate remains by: 1. The effects of excitatory amino acids and some antagonists applied by ionophoresis to stratum radiatum in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices were examined on the locally recorded field e.p.s.p.

evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer collateral‐commissural projection. by: Buy Excitatory Amino Acids: Ten Years Later (Biomedical and Health Research, V. 45) on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders.

Amino acid neurotransmitters that depolarize neurons and mediate excitatory synaptic transmission. Potential candidates include glutamate, aspartate, cysteate and homocysteate. Excitatory amino acids are used as transmitters for synapses in ascending and descending pain pathways.

Excitatory amino acids and synaptic transmission edited by H. Wheal and A. Thomson, Academic Press, £ ( pages) ISBN 0 12 6Author: T.W. Stone. Amino acid neurotransmitters that depolarize neurons and mediate excitatory synaptic transmission.

Potential candidates include glutamate, aspartate, cysteate, and homocysteate. Excitatory amino acids are used as transmitters for synapses in ascending and descending pain pathways. Glutamate Panorama. (Book Reviews: Excitatory Amino Acids and Synaptic Transmission.).

De Belleroche JS, Bradford HF ( 3) Amino acids in synaptic vesicles from mammalian cerebral cortex: a reappraisal. J Neurochem – Google Scholar Do KQ, Mattenberger M, Streil P, Cuénod M () In vitro release of endogenous excitatory sulfur-containing amino acids from various rat brain by: 8.

An overview of some of the processes involved in synaptic transmission is shown in Figure Many of the processes are discussed below or in other chapters of this book. The predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, glutamate, and the inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord, glycine, are common and essential amino.

It has recently become clear that the excitatory amino acids and their receptors are critically linked to normal processes of development and synaptic transmission, and to learning and memory, as well as to identifiable disease processes such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and cortical damage due to.

The excitatory potency of the acidic amino acids glutamate and aspartate in various regions of the central nervous system (CNS) has been recognized since the s.1,2 Nevertheless, the earlier findings that these amino acids are (1) constituents of intermediary metabolism and are (2) located in the brain ubiquitously in high concentrations rendered them unlikely candidates as by:.

This book provides a comprehensive, easy-to-read survey of excitatory amino acids and synaptic transmission. It begins with descriptions of the structure, function, and pharmacology of both the ionotropic and the metabotropic glutamate receptors and the glutamate transporters.

Subsequent chapters deal with molecular aspects of the regulation of glutamatergic transmission, including .Abstract. 1. The effects of excitatory amino acids and some antagonists applied by ionophoresis to stratum radiatum in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices were examined on the locally recorded field e.p.s.p.

evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer collateral-commissural by: Provides an easy-to-read survey of excitatory amino acids and synaptic transmission. This book includes the descriptions of the structure, function, and pharmacology of both the ionotropic and the metabotropic glutamate receptors and the glutamate transporters.

It is useful for neuroscientists, pharmacologists, neurologists, and psychiatrists.